Phases of the Moon Craft Project for Kids

    CRAFTS CLASSES
    TO INSPIRE CREATIVITY
    by Stacy Zeiger

    About the Author

    Stacy Zeiger began writing in 2000 for "Suburban News Publication" in Ohio and has expanded to teaching writing as an eighth grade English teacher. Zeiger completed creative writing course work at Miami University and holds a B.A. in English and a M.Ed. in secondary education from Ohio State.

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    The moon passes through eight phases every month: waxing crescent, first quarter, waxing gibbous, full, waning gibbous, last/third quarter, waning crescent and new moon. Encourage children to go outside at night throughout the month and observe the changes in the moon. Children can then create crafts to find and document the phases of the moon by making a moon finder or keeping a moon journal.

    Moon Journal

    Have children cut out at least 29 equal-sized circles from white or light gray construction paper and staple them together on one side to form a book. Children can decorate the front cover to represent the full moon and include a title for the book such as "My Moon Journal" or "The Phases of the Moon." For 28 days, children can go outside at night and shade in a page of the journal to show what the moon looks like. The date and time should also be written on each page. Older children can label the phase each picture shows. At the end of four weeks, children will have a book to remind them of the phases of the moon.

    Moon Flip Chart

    Create a moon calendar by dividing a large piece of black construction paper into eight equal sections, drawing horizontal lines across the paper to mark the sections. Fold the paper in half vertically, then unfold and cut across the lines, stopping at the middle of the paper. Write the names of the eight phases of the moon, one on each flap, on the front of the paper using a white or yellow crayon. Draw a picture of what the moon looks like at that phase as well. Cut out rectangles of white paper the same size as the flaps and write facts about each moon phase on them. Glue them to the inside of the construction paper, so when children lift a flap, they can see information about that moon phase.

    Moon Cookies

    Using a basic sugar cookie recipe, bake circle-shaped cookies. Once the cookies have cooled, children can use yellow icing to decorate the cookies to represent the phases of the moon. Use a food-coloring pen or gel icing tube and have children write the name of each moon phase on the cookies.

    Moon Mobile

    Create a mobile that represents the eight phases of the moon. Cut out eight equal-sized circles from cardboard. Punch a hole in the top and bottom of each circle. Shade each circle with a pencil or crayon to represent each phase of the moon, being sure to shade both sides. Cut out eight rectangles from cardboard and write the name of each moon phase on each side of the rectangles. Cut a hole in the top of each rectangle. Tie yarn in each hole of the cardboard circle. Tie the end of the yarn at the top of the circles to a hanger in order of the moon phases. Use the bottom yarn to attach the moon circles to the rectangles with the correct name.

    Photo Credits

    • NASA/Photodisc/Getty Images