How to Make a Viking Shield for Kids Out of Cardboard

    CRAFTS CLASSES
    TO INSPIRE CREATIVITY
    by Cara Murphy

    About the Author

    Cara Murphy holds a Master of Arts in communication with an emphasis in online journalism. Murphy is a stay-at-home mom who has worked as a writer for several years and appreciates that writing allows her to spend more time with her son.

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    Viking shields complete any Viking or warrior outfit. Make a Viking shield for kids out of cardboard so that it's lightweight and easy to carry and cover it in soft leather to make it match a brown Viking outfit. Decorate it with aluminum foil or metal leather studs to give it a finished look, then create similar chest armor, headband and wristbands out of the same materials to match. The wealthier the Viking, the more metal his helmet and shield contained.

    Things You'll Need

    • Corrugated packaging cardboard
    • Leather belt (or another material)
    • Measuring tape
    • Aluminum foil
    • Metal leather studs
    • Rubber mallet
    • Glue

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    Measure your child's arm from his knuckles to his elbow, then multiply by two for the diameter of the shield.

    Cut the cardboard in the shape of a circle using the diameter measurement as a guide.

    Cut two horizontal slits on opposite side of the shield. Thread the belt up through the bottom slit and back through the top slit. Run the belt along the back of the shield where the child's arm will be, then thread it through the two remaining slits. Buckle the belt to itself.

    Glue tinfoil to the outside of the shield either to completely cover it or to create lines of decorative "metal." Alternatively, glue leather or an imitation material to the outside of the shield for a brown version of the shield. Hammer metal studs into the leather to decorate it.

    • Apply reflective material to the shield so that your child will be safe trick-or-treating at night.

    References

    • Nifty, Thrifty, No-Sew Costumes and Props for Children: Teacher Resource; Carol Ann Bloom