How to Make Stenciled Letters

    CRAFTS CLASSES
    TO INSPIRE CREATIVITY
    by Linda Shepard

    About the Author

    Linda Shepard has been staff writer for "C & G Newspapers" for over 10 years, covering local government and crime and serving as the newspaper's food writer. She has written for "Michigan Meetings Magazine" and is also the owner of Spectacularstrolls.com, an online business of self-guided walking tours.

    ×

    A computer and printer can help you create your own professional-looking stencils. The wide availability of word processing fonts gives you a variety of letter style and size options. The stenciled letters can be used to add monograms to the inside covers of books or to add poetic phrases to a hallway wall. Children, who will need the aid of adult to create the stencil, will find many creative uses for a stencil that features the letters of their name.

    Things You'll Need

    • Polyester film/plastic sheet
    • Craft knife
    • Wooden cutting board
    • Painters tape
    • Acrylic paint
    • Pouncing paintbrush
    • Newspaper

    show more

    Determine the style and size font of the completed letter stencil on your computer’s word processor. Print out only the letters needed for the completed stencil design, leaving at least 1 inch between each letter on the computer paper.

    Cover the letters with the polyester plastic sheet, with the rough side facing up. Trace the letters with a pencil on the sheet. Remove the paper.

    Place the sheet on the cutting board. Cut through the outside edges of all the letters carefully with the craft knife to make the stencil.

    Place the stencil on a sheet of newspaper. Add a small amount of paint to the pouncing paintbrush. Push the paint through the stencil to the newspaper to practice making the completed stenciled letterers.

    Attach the stencil to the object to be stenciled with the painter's tape. Use the pouncing paintbrush to make the stenciled letters. Remove the stencil immediately.

    References

    • “Stencil Me In,” Marthe Le Van; Lark Books; 2009
    • “Stencil Techniques;” Jane Gauss; Watson-Guptil Publications; 1995

    Photo Credits

    • BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images