How to Make Paper Origami Stars

    CRAFTS CLASSES
    TO INSPIRE CREATIVITY
    by Naomi Judd

    About the Author

    Naomi M. Judd is a naturalist, artist and writer. Her work has been published in various literary journals, newspapers and websites. Judd holds a self-designed Bachelor of Arts in adventure writing from Plymouth State University and is earning a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from the University of Southern Maine.

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    Stars are some of the easiest shapes to make with origami paper. These 3D origami stars, sometimes called origami lucky stars or origami wishing stars, can be a great project for kids or adults. Start a wishing jar by writing a wish on the paper strip before you fold the star. A clear glass jar of folded wishing stars makes a nice gift for birthdays and other special occasions.

    Things You'll Need

    • Origami paper strip
    • Scissors

    Cut a strip of origami paper that is 8 inches by 1/2 inch.

    Fold down about 1 1/2 inches of the strip. If you want the colored side to show when the star is finished, be sure that the colored side is what you see of the folded piece.

    Use the folded piece and fold it up so that its right side meets the left side of the long, white strip. Fold the excess tail around the back to create a hexagon.

    Fold up the long, white tail so that it meets the angle of the right side of the hexagon.

    Continue to wrap the tail around the shape of the hexagon. The paper should be wrapped neatly and tightly, so all sides line up with each other.

    Tuck the last little piece of the paper under the fold of the last wraparound. It is fine to trim the paper slightly, if needed.

    Hold the paper between your thumb and forefinger. Using a finger on your other hand, dent one side in with your nail. Dent the other four sides carefully. This is the hardest part of the project. If the star hexagon was not wrapped tightly enough, it will bend instead of dent neatly.

    • Try making larger stars by increasing the length and width of the strip.
    • Make smaller stars by decreasing the length and width.