How to Make a Lion Mask Out of A Paper Plate

    CRAFTS CLASSES
    TO INSPIRE CREATIVITY
    by Alicia Bodine

    About the Author

    Alicia Bodine has been a professional writer for six years. She has produced thousands of articles for online publications such as Demand Studios, Bright Hub, Associated Content and WiseGeek. Bodine is also the current cooking guru for LifeTips. She has received awards for being a top content producer.

    ×

    Little kids love pretending to be animals they see in the zoo. You can work with your child to make a lion mask from a paper plate to help him get even more into the role of playing a lion. Making the mask is fun and allows your child to explore his creativity. Throw in a real life lesson about lions and you have just created an educational experience your youngster will never forget.

    Things You'll Need

    • Hole puncher
    • Scissors
    • Paint
    • Paintbrush
    • Chenille sticks
    • Glue
    • Ribbon

    show more

    Lay out the paper plate in front of you. Punch one hole on the middle edge of the right side and one hole on the middle edge of the left side. These holes will let you attach the ribbon so you can wear the mask later.

    Cut 1-inch slits all the way around the paper plate to create the look of a lion's mane. Be careful not to cut your two holes.

    Cut out 2 eye holes. To find out where you need to cut the holes, hold the paper plate up to your face. Mark the location of your eyes on the paper plate and use the scissors to cut out the holes.

    Paint your lion mask. You can use typical lion colors, such as orange, yellow or brown, or get creative and use any colors you like. Let the paint dry thoroughly.

    Cut 3 chenille sticks in half and glue 3 pieces on each side of the lion's cheeks to make whiskers.

    Cut two pieces of ribbon, each about 18 inches long. Tie one piece through each of the punched holes in the paper plate and tie the other ends together to secure the mask on your head.

    • Lay out newspaper on your workspace so that nothing gets paint on it. You may even want to wear a smock so you don't get any paint on your clothes.
    • Supervise younger children when working with scissors.
    • Use non-toxic paint if the mask if for a child.

    References

    • Paper Plate Crafts: Creative Art Fun for 3- To 7-Year Olds; Laura Check

    Resources

    • National Geographic Little Kids First Big Book of Animals; Catherine D. Hughes